Six Ways to Take Back the Day

Gratitude—and mindfulness—is a very direct antidote to grumpiness. Try one of these practices right now.

Do you ever notice that you are going about your day and you find yourself on a negative thought train? You keep repeating the same negative sentence over and over again.

  • “I don’t like_______about my job.”
  • “I don’t like_______about my body.
  • “My life just isn’t what I want it to be.”

As you stay on this negative thought train, you notice your body feeling tense and your overall enjoyment of the day going down. Research shows that obsessive thinking and rumination are associated with binge-eating, anxiety, depression, lack of self-esteem, and greater irritability and restlessness.

Our ability to make judgements about our environment helped us survive when we were hunter-gatherers. However, this way of thinking doesn’t benefit us so much at the supermarket, in the office, or in bed. Furthermore, obsessing and ruminating about the past or the future will only lead one to feeling disempowered and frustrated.… READ MORE...

How to Tame the Wanting Mind

What feels like “enough”? Carley Hauck explores how to build a healthier relationship to the things we’re attached to—and the things we desire.

Have you ever wanted something so badly that you prayed for it, you saved up for it, and/or you worked really hard for it? Then once you got it, you thought, “Hmmm, this wasn’t as great as I built it up to be and now I want something else”?

The mind always yearns for something more. It might desire a new experience, a pleasant feeling or sensation, or crave the acquisition of something that it feels will bring pleasure. However, the experiences, sensations, and/or pleasant feelings that we strive for don’t last and we often find ourselves wanting more. The one thing we can count on in this life is impermanence and continuous change. Here are a few examples of impermanence:

  • You have been saving up for this really amazing trip and all the right conditions are in place to take it and go.
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How to Change a Habit for Good

How mindfulness and a rewarding routine can help us develop good habits that last.

Do you have a habit that you can’t change no matter what you have tried? For the last decade, I have worked as a teacher, coach, and consultant with companies. The subject of what drives and sustains change internally and socially fascinates me. I can say with absolute confidence that I know the steps to change a habit for good. These four tried and tested steps all start with the M word, Mindfulness.

Step 1: Mindfulness

What are habits? Habits are behaviors that become automatic because they have been performed frequently in the past. This repetition or automaticity creates a mental association between the situation (cue) and action (behavior).

Automaticity is the opposite of mindfulness. Research suggests that 45% of our behaviors are repeated almost daily (1).

Mindfulness is paying attention in the present moment. When mindfulness is present, we can see our thoughts, feelings, motivations, reactions, and responses with greater clarity and wisdom.… READ MORE...